If children lose contact with nature they won’t fight for it…

A few extracts from an important article by George Monbiot:

‘The remarkable collapse of children’s engagement with nature – which is even faster than the collapse of the natural world – is recorded in Richard Louv’s book Last Child in the Woods, and in a report published recently by the National Trust. Since the 1970s the area in which children may roam without supervision has decreased by almost 90%. In one generation the proportion of children regularly playing in wild places in the UK has fallen from more than half to fewer than one in 10. In the US, in just six years (1997-2003) children with particular outdoor hobbies fell by half. Eleven- to 15-year-olds in Britain now spend, on average, half their waking day in front of a screen.

There are several reasons for this collapse: parents’ irrational fear of strangers and rational fear of traffic, the destruction of the fortifying commons where previous generations played, the quality of indoor entertainment, the structuring of children’s time, the criminalisation of natural play. The great indoors, as a result, has become a far more dangerous place than the diminished world beyond…’

…And here we meet the other great loss. Most of those I know who fight for nature are people who spent their childhoods immersed in it. Without a feel for the texture and function of the natural world, without an intensity of engagement almost impossible in the absence of early experience, people will not devote their lives to its protection…

Read more at The Guardian: If children lose contact with nature they won’t fight for it.

Green woodland in the Berkshires, Western Massachusetts.

Green woodland in the Berkshires, Western Massachusetts.
Photo © Tom Bland.

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One response to “If children lose contact with nature they won’t fight for it…

  1. Interesting and worrisome. I for one am grateful for a childhood that was pre-internet, pre-smart phone, and pre-HD TV. We had family vacations up in the Adirondacks or at a national park, we kept an informal record of all the fascinating animals that came through our suburban backyard, and playing outside was a rite of childhood. Sad that this has become less and less of the norm. As a society we are truly in uncharted territory, never have we become so disconnected from our natural world.

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