Greenbrook Sanctuary and its resident Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron in Winter

Great blue heron in winter at Greenbrook Sanctuary.
Photo © Diana Pappas.

Here’s a moment of tranquility for you to start your weekend off right: A great blue heron presiding over the pond at Greenbrook Sanctuary, just a few short miles from New York City in New Jersey.

Located atop the Palisades, Greenbrook Sanctuary is a refuge for us. It’s a place to go for long walks and take in breathtaking views of the Hudson River, watch the seasons drift from one to the next, and spot some truly amazing wildlife. We’ve seen bald eagles, ravens, a pileated woodpecker, a kingfisher, skunks, bats, deer, wild turkeys, red-winged blackbirds, red-tailed hawks, and lots more! True to its name, it’s a really peaceful and serene place, and often it’s just us and the wildlife, and we can wander and discover without passing another person.  Greenbrook Sanctuary is occasionally open to the public but for year round access you need to join and become a member. There’s something about pulling up to the gate, unlocking it, and entering the sanctuary that makes it all the more special, like a secret woodland.

If you are in the area, you should pay Greenbrook Sanctuary a visit on a Visitor’s Day and consider membership (see their website for contact info and details).  And if you’re not in the area, we hope you enjoy visiting through our blog as we will be posting about our discoveries and experiences at Greenbrook Sanctuary quite often. Thanks for reading, and have a lovely, nature-filled weekend wherever you are!

View of the Hudson River from Greenbrook Sanctuary

View of the Hudson River from Greenbrook Sanctuary.
Photo © Tom Bland.

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2 responses to “Greenbrook Sanctuary and its resident Great Blue Heron.

  1. Greenbrook is very special. Hopefully you’ll see other herons joining in – like the grey heron in UK, to which yours is closely related, they nest in groups and make a lot of noise doing so.

  2. I’ll definitely keep an eye out for this behavior on future trips to Greenbrook! I’ve seen so many solitary herons in my life, so seeing a group of them all together like that would be fascinating.

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